European News European Union change rules on free movement

Migration Facts Ireland

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The EU has just passed a law that could end the problems with free movement which led to Brexit in the first place

Corporations will no longer be able to undercut local workers by exploiting migrants.

Yesterday the European parliament passed a new law that will end the conflation of free movement of people with the undercutting of local workers by EU migrants.
During the 2016 EU referendum campaign, the issue of free movement was front and centre. Remember all those people saying how eastern European workers would come to the UK and work for less, meaning they couldn’t get jobs in their own towns? The EU has finally addressed this issue.
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/eu-brexit-uk-labour-laws-migrant-workers-a8375836.html

Whilst this is welcome news it would also explain why the Irish government recently changed the rules of work permits for those outside of the EU.


Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys has announced changes to the work permit scheme to address immediate shortages of low-skilled, lower wage employees in the horticulture, meat processing, and dairy industries.
The changes will enable employers to apply to bring in 800 workers from outside the European Economic Area from next Monday.


Work permit scheme changes to address labour shortages

We have seen evidence in the past on how those from outside the EU are exploited


Family reunification

Your right to have your family come and live with you in Ireland depends on the type of permit you have. You can find out about the residence rights of family members.
Protection for migrant workers

Foreign nationals who are legally working in Ireland have exactly the same rights under employment legislation as Irish working here.
The new employment permit is given to the employee. The permit contains a statement of the rights and entitlements of the worker. The statement of rights includes the information about when and how the worker may change employment. The statement also includes details of pay, rights under the national minimum wage legislation and any deductions which it is proposed to make from that pay – for example, for accommodation. The national minimum wage legislation allows for certain deductions to be made from the statutory minimum pay of an employee if the employee is provided with board and/or lodgings.
Employers are not allowed to deduct expenses associated with recruitment from the employee's pay and are not allowed retain any of the worker’s personal documents.


Coming to work in Ireland


The national minimum wage legislation allows for certain deductions to be made from the statutory minimum pay of an employee if the employee is provided with board and/or lodgings.


I wonder how much accommodation is being provided to reduce that minimum wage requirement?


This is how workers from outside the EU were exploited in the UK a few years back, looks like Ireland is playing catch up.

Remember, Migrant workers from outside the EU are unable to change jobs, they are on a visa and can only remain by keeping that job, I bet these jobs come with accommodation.

Revealed: Scandal of Britain's fruit-farm workers

Bulgarians are flown to Britain, live in packed caravan compounds and pocket just £45 a week to pick fruit for Britain's biggest retailers

The workers are officially paid the minimum wage of £5.74, a comparatively high sum for foreign nationals who often have an average annual income of less than £3,000 in their own countries. But employee pay slips obtained by The Independent show that the real hourly rate for the company's fruit pickers often amounts to less than half the minimum wage once a series of obligatory charges has been deducted.


One pay slip handed to The Independent by a Bulgarian employee who still picks strawberries on a farm in Brierley near Leominster, Herefordshire, showed that his net pay one week once the charges were removed was £45.12 for 19 hours of work – an equivalent of being paid just £2.37 an hour. Another employee at the same farm was paid £58 for 22 hours' work, the equivalent of just £2.61 per hour. The most substantial pay slip seen by The Independent, which was earned by a fruit picker last month, provided £70 for 16 hours' work, or £4.43 per hour.
Revealed: Scandal of Britain's fruit-farm workers


Looks like a long history of it in Ireland too
Construction workers had to live in terrible conditions, court hears
20 workers allege they were underpaid while working for Portuguese companies hired to build a section of the N7.


Construction workers had to live in terrible conditions, court hears
 
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